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In developing countries, how do we make foreign aid truly redundant?

In developing countries, how do we make foreign aid truly redundant?

Recently, I was interviewed by Devex, a media platform on global development, about how international NGOs working in developing countries can truly make themselves redundant – by planning and executing their own exit. Here’s a few excerpts from the full (paywalled) interview by Lisa Cornish. — It has been almost three months since the Humanitarian Institute announced itsRead more about In developing countries, how do we make foreign aid truly redundant?[…]

The myth of the heroic expat leader

The myth of the heroic expat leader

After close to a decade of working in developing countries, and founding an initiative in Cambodia, I realised I had fallen into a trap. I was perpetuating a myth: that change comes from the heroics of foreigners like myself. The reality couldn’t be further from the truth.

7 signs during recruitment that your potential employer is a dud

7 signs during recruitment that your potential employer is a dud

There’s a lot of career advice out there on how to get a job. But almost all this advice is on the basis of a false power dynamic: the employer has more power than the potential employee. But as an employee, why would you apply for a position where you’re going to be miserable? During the recruitment process, how can you spot a potentially poor workplace? Here’s 7 tips I’ve come up with.

Australia, we have a problem when we can’t look ourselves in the mirror

Australia, we have a problem when we can’t look ourselves in the mirror

After witnessing an incident of racism and misogyny in public, and mentioning it on Twitter, I was called an “ingrate” and told to leave Australia. But, surely nothing indicates a love of country more than a desire to improve it. Imagine a place where we listened to what people said, rather than where they had come from, or the type of surname they had. That’s a country worth aspiring to.

Welcome to OIC’s new leader, Chenda Net

Welcome to OIC’s new leader, Chenda Net

I leave OIC Cambodia in country in a far better state that I could have imagined. With structure, an exit strategy, and most importantly, the best possible people controlling its destiny. Our new leader, Chenda, is not “replacing Weh”. She is entering a new position, has her own style of leadership, and will do things her way. She has my full support from afar, to make decisions her way and guide the organisation in the way that she sees fit.